Search Results for: meet the locals

Ireland, Travel Video Guide, Meet the Locals

Ireland Travel Video Guide

Locations we visited in Ireland

Location List
*Dublin
*Doolin
*Dingle
*Galway
*Aran Islands
*Belfast
*Kilkenny
*Cork
*Ring of Kerry


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Vietnam Travel Series – Overlander.tv Meet a Local

Explore unique Vietnam from the top to the bottom, meeting locals at top tourist destinations. (English and Vietnamese Language)

Stories include:
*Heritage listed Ha Long Bay is a major tourist attraction in Vietnam, and rightly so.The bay is home to over a thousand jungle clad limestone pillars, several of which are hollow and contain enormous caves.

*I next visit Cat Ba Island, the largest island in the bay. Half of Cat ba is National Park.I interview Tuan, a local cafe owner. He takes me for a tour of the island and we also visit a floating village, where people farm fish in small enclosures.

*Homestay with a Hill Tribe family. There are 54 ethnic groups in Vietnam.?Most are located in the remote highlands. The village of Ban Luc, where we stayed, was made up of an ethnic group called White Thai. It was a great experience to stay with a family in their traditional stilt house, with bamboo slate floor and palm leaf roof. To see how they cook, to wander the idyllic village and get a glimpse of rural life. We got to try local specialities like bamboo rice and a home made alcoholic beverage drank through bamboo straws. The community put on a song and dance show featuring traditional dance and instruments.

*Hanoi has a 1000 year history as a city. It has been invaded by the Chinese, French and Japanese. The French Colonial period in particular has had a noticeable influence on the aesthetics of the City. I visit a Bia Hoi Bar where I find relief from the constant rush and din. Lan, a student in International Relations, gives me a half day tour of Hanoi. We visit the flower market, watch people exercise around Hoan Kiem Lake, and visit Lan’s favorite restaurant, Hai Vuong Quan.

*Hue was the ancient imperial city of the Nguyen Dynasty. I visit the Citadel which once contained the forbidden city, and take a dragon boat tour along the Perfume River to view the Thien Mu Pagoda and the Tombs of the Emperors. I meet up with Nhi, a commerce student who takes me to Thanh Toan Bridge where we meet a fortune teller. Nhi discusses superstition in Vietnam and we both get our palms read.

*Hoi An was the most important trading port in South East Asia in the 16th and 17th Century. It traded items like silk, ceramics and spices with China, Japan, Europe, India, and even Arabia.Then due to certain changes, it sat dormant for 200 years, remaining unchanged, until recently discovered by tourists.I interviewed Eric Kappeler, a Swiss-born sculptor living in Hoi An.I also get to see a display of Cham dancing, and visit Marble Mountain, where sculptors have made a vision of hell in the subterranean caves.

*In Nha Trang I do a story on the positive impact tourists can have on local people. Mai Loc was a cyclo driver, a chance meeting with a Norwegian couple and their gift to Loc, of a small camera, lead to him changing careers and realising his talent as a photographer. Self taught, Loc’s photos have been exhibited around the world. I also visit Monkey Island where monkeys have been taught to ride bikes.

*The hill village of Dalat is a temperate tourist escape from the tropical heat of the rest of Vietnam. The most common tourist activity in Dalat is to take an Easy Rider guided motorcycle of the surrounding countryside. I take a tour and visit a silk worm farm, a waterfall, watch traditional weaving, and visit a rural blacksmith who offers me a homemade alcoholic brew made of rice and reptile animal parts! For lunch we visit a local diner where we learn how Pho, beef noodle soup, is prepared.

*I think the first thing that you notice about Ho Chi Minh City is the traffic, elbow to elbow, a constant drone of motorcycle motors and horns. In Saigon, I interviewed video artist, Tran Dan, asking him where he finds inspiration in such a bustling city.

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Spain Travel Program – Meet a Local Series

Travel Spain and appreciate it’s amazing diversity by meeting the locals.

Stories include:
*In Sevilla I interview two flamenco dancers, Asa Danielson from Sweden, and Elena Moro Roman, an Australian of Spanish Background. Both have moved to Sevilla to practice flamenco. I also try to define the flamenco term ‘Duende’, with interpretative dance and poetry.

*Cuenca, a Unesco World Heritage site, has a rich and varied history. Best known for it’s Hanging Houses, Cuenca was founded as a Moorish fort, became a centre for religious orders, and more recently, became home for many artists. I interview Alberto Cuesta Senior about the joys of maintaining a garden and spoke with Antonio Perez about his Contemporary Art Museum.

*Benimaclet was a farming village on the outskirts of Valencia. As Valencia grows, one history replaces another. Alberto Cuesta, a scientist discusses the changes occurring in his Benimaclet neighborhood.

*Cave Dwellers (cuevas) of San Miguel Alto. In Granada I visit the Alhambra, a fine example of Moorish Architecture, which uses the aesthetically pleasing golden ratio in its dimensions. I then learn about cave living, interviewing such characters as Dr, Sun, who uses a solar cooking machine to prepare meals.

*What I like about Vigo is that it is not a tourist town. It is just a town where Spanish life carries on as it has for generations. I was a guest of the Ramallo family, and interviewed Fernando Ramallo, a linguistics professor, about the various languages spoken in Spain.

*The Basque people and their language may well be the oldest in europe, pre dating the Celts and the Romans. I investigate whether they know of the fountain of youth. Rebecca Ezquerro helps me on my search

*It is always interesting to hear what people have to say about their city. In Barcelona I interviewed Nick Musgrave, and englishman who moved from London to pursuit photography, and Pilar de la Pena Sanchez, who believes the streets of Barcelona act out like a movie.

*The theme for my Madrid video is follow your dream. I interview Marta Escauriaza about living her dream of running a restaurant, and Javier Icazuriaga about his recently established music recording business.

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Outback Australia, Darwin to Adelaide, Meet a Local Travel Series

Outback Australia – Down the Guts’ travel program

Litchfield National Park is actually a more popular National Park with territorian locals than Kakadu – why? You can visit all it’s sites in one day, you can swim without fear of crocodiles, and you don’t have to pay fees to get in. of particular note are it’s swimming holes and waterfalls.

The Grove Hill Hotel is a real outback boozer 16 km’s off the main road. Every month the publicans Stan and Mary put on a free bbq.

Had a great night, met some interesting locals, enjoyed the pre 1970’s music Stan was playing…and even had a dance.

Katherine’s major tourist attraction is the Katherine Gorge which consists of 13 natural gorges carved through sandstone by the Katherine River.

We interviewed a French Helicopter Pilot, William Massart, who takes joy flights over the gorge.

Wycliffe Well Roadhouse is known as Australia’s premier U.F.O. sightings location. Numerous people have reported seeing strange lights in the sky while staying a Wycliffe.

I interviewed Lew Farkas, owner of the roadhouse about the U.F.O. sightings.

In Alice Springs we enjoyed trying crocodile, kangaroo, camel and emu at Overlander Steakhouse and let our hair down at Bojangles Saloon

Situated 117 km’s West of Alice Springs. Wallace Rock Hole is an Aranda Aboriginal community which runs Aboriginal Culture Rockart tours which cover such things as bush medicine, bush tucker, the history of the Aranda people and visits to ancient rock art sites

We interviewed Benjamin, a local guide about his community.

In Coober Pedy we interviewed Jenny Gough from the Old Timers Mine

Jenny is a long term resident of Coober Pedy and in the video talks about how a stoke of good luck resulted in finding and funding the Old Timers Mine.

In Adelaide we interviewed Anna Pak Poy from nomads world – Australia’s finest chain of backpacking hostels

Anna helped organise our accommodation for the trip. She was born and bred in Adelaide and has such a passion for the place, we couldn’t go past interviewing her.

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The Best of Bora Bora, where to eat, drink, sleep, shop and what tour to do

Here is the Top 5 Tour Bora Bora handpicked local tourism business selections for where to eat, drink, sleep, shop and what tour to do. We wanted to show travellers that Bora Bora doesn’t have to be expensive, that there are some reasonably priced options. That allow one to meet the locals and feel part of the family, an important aspect of Tahitian life –

Best Restaurant – Snack Matira
Best Bar – Bloody Mary’s
Best Accommodation – Noni Pensione
Best Tour – Rohivai Lagoon Tour
Best Shopping – Bora Bora Original

Overview Video of the Best of Bora Bora

Best Restaurant in Bora Bora

Best Bar in Bora Bora

Best Accommodation in Bora Bora

Best Tour to do in Bora Bora

Best Shopping in Bora Bora

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Programs

Overlander.tv make honest to goodness travel related content that capture the thrill of travel! We understand that travellers want the truth about the places they wish to visit, so we endeavour to make authentic videos that rely heavily on the advice of locals. Our youtube channel is Australia’s Biggest Travel Channel with 20 million+ views and 35,000+ subscribers.

Journey to the West Series (in production)
2016

“A world traveler returns to his own country to explore it’s West Coast on a motorcycle. An exercise in simplicity, camping out and getting off the beaten track. A chance to reassess life choices. The freedom to explore alternatives. What is it we need to be happy and is Australia still the lucky country”

In search of La Dolce Vita
2015
One Hour

Two strangers travel through italy searching for la dolce vita, asking local people about love, life and happiness, and finding answers themselves along the way.
Scott is an Australian wineblogger who had minor success with his first novel. He has lost interest in writing and is undergoing a midlife crisis. Charlotte is a Luxembourg fan of Scott who befriended him online and invited him to join her on a trip through Italy. She has been a librarian for 15 years and feels ready for a change, but is unsure what.
On a roadtrip taking in some of the most scenic parts of Italy – Aosta, Lake Como, Venice, Cinque Terre, Tuscany, Umbria and the Amalfi Coast, Scott and Charlotte meet the locals and learn the secrets of what make a good life!

American Roadtrip
2014
3 x 30 mins

Overlander.tv spent four months traveling the length and breadth of America, from Hollywood to the Wild West, from the Deep South to the Latin American vibes of Miami, from moonshine stills in the Tennessee Hills, to the frenetic pace of downtown New York, and finally visiting the post apocalyptic urban decay of Detroit and the rebirth of cool in the Rust Belt City of Cleveland.
Australian Filmmaker Mark Shea’s personable style features first person stories with locals at each destination he visited. It gives each story a candid insight into where America stands in what many call the Asian Century.

The Original Travel Vlogger – Central America
2012
4 x 30 mins
Guatemala, Mexico, Belize and Cuba

Youtube’s original travel vlogger explores the culture, food and people of Central America, including a sailing trip to Cuba.

The Original Travel Vlogger – Asia
2011
8 x 30 mins

Youtube’s original travel vlogger explores the culture, food and people of Asia, visiting Bali, Malaysia, Borneo, Philippines, Japan, South Korea, China, Laos, Cambodia and the hermit kingdom North Korea.

Meet the Locals – New Zealand
2010
One Hour

Explore New Zealand’s top tourist destinations by meeting the locals

African Refugees
2008
Four part series commissioned by the ABC

Mark Shea examines the African refugee experience in Tasmania. The African community started arriving in Tasmania in 1994 and since then 1,700 people have arrived, with 60%-70% settling in greater Hobart, and the remainder settling in and around Launceston.
Sudan, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Ethiopia are some of the communities now represented in Tasmania

Meet the Locals – Tasmania
2006
One Hour

Explore Tasmania’s top tourist destinations by meeting the locals

Meet the Locals – Vietnam
2006
30 minutes

Explore Vietnam’s top tourist destinations by meeting the locals

Meet the locals – Spain
2006
One Hour

Explore Spain’s top tourist destinations by meeting the locals

Meet the locals – Ireland
2006
One Hour

Explore Ireland’s top tourist destinations by meeting the locals

Last Outback Boxing Troupe
2006
Four part series commissioned by the ABC

Fred Brophy’s Boxing Troupe is the last tent operating in the world. Before the early 1970’s, Traveling Boxing Tents were part of the regular landscape at most country shows.
The tents have such a long tradition in Australia, that in some towns, a young man will fight in the tent, watched proudly by their grandfather and father, both of whom also fought in a tents as young men.
When Fred Brophy retires, is it the end of the road for the Tent Boxing tradition.

The Way, Camino de Santiago, Spain
2004
75 Mins

The Camino de Santiago in Northern Spain is one of the world’s most popular Pilgrimages.
Filmmaker Mark Shea wished to explore the spiritual affect the Camino (Way of St. James) has on pilgrims, by walking the French Way alone and documenting his own personal experiences.
The resulting film is an honest and joyous portrayal of the transformative nature of this
ancient practice.
A must see for anyone who has walked the Camino, or anyone who has plans of partaking in this life changing experience in the future.

Returning Home, A story of Ararat, ABC
2004
Four part series commissioned by the ABC (online flash format)

Follows the fortunes of the country town of my birth, Ararat

Meet the Locals – Australia Series
2001
4 x 30 minutes

Visit Australia’s top tourist destinations, from the outback to the coast, exploring each location, through the eyes of local guides.

When two strangers make a film in Italy.

Years ago I made a film whereby I walked the Camino de Santiago. This film has been very popular, not a week goes by where someone doesn’t contact me from somewhere around the world thanking me for that film.

One such person who contacted me was a television editor from Luxembourg. What started as a string of emails became the idea of taking a roadtrip through Italy to make a film. Michele had never been in front of camera before, and in some strange luxembourgish logic, decided it would be easier if we played characters instead of playing ourselves. So an idea was formed; do Italians know best how to live la dolce vita – the good life.

Michele organised a schedule that took us to some of her favourite parts of Italy. She also managed to get some luxury hotels interested in the idea and organised to meet up with family members from her dad’s side, that she hadn’t seen since she was a child.

So over two very hectic weeks, we filmed, scripted and acted in our own 2 person crew film. We did everything, and what’s even more amazing is that english isn’t even Michele’s first language. Sometimes in a scene she would have this contemplative deep look on her face, a look every actor would die for, that James Dean, Marlon Brando brooding ‘what’s on their mind’ look. In most cases she was just struggling to find the right english words! In fact all the people who appeared in our film were first timers in front of the camera, and we thank each one of you.

People we met seemed to love the idea that two strangers, an Australian and a Luxembourger, travel Italy in a small car, called Caldo (hot in italian) because the air conditioning didn’t work, to make a film about two strangers traveling Italy! It was such an audacious act and I’m so glad I decided to get involved in what was a ridiculously short amount of time to produce a film!

I want to tell you one story about my co-pilot for this intrepid undertaking. We wanted to visit the last free camping beach on the Cinque Terre – Guvano Beach. The only problem was, to get there, one must walk over one kilometre along a pitch black underground railway tunnel. And then at the end of the tunnel, one must pass the gauntlet of a gang of homeless thieves called the Punk Bastards, who have been known to hassle visitors for money. Michele was warned not to visit this beach at night by a local, ‘No one can hear you scream down there’ he said.

michele

The picture above shows the reality of our bare bones production. This was just before we left for Guvano Beach on dusk. A borrowed tent, sleeping gear stuffed into shopping bags, it was a shambles. But I love this photo, because it captures the valour of our production. Michele knew visiting Guvano beach at night could be dangerous, but she put her trust in me that I’d protect her no matter what!

As we left the dank, dark tunnel, sure enough we were confronted by some rough looking men gathered around a makeshift wooden shelter. I said hello to a man who approached me speaking quick italian. He wore circus pants and a goatee beard and pony tail. I didn’t understand a word he was saying and smiled and just kept walking. Michele on the other hand understood every word. He started raising his voice and waving his hands around like a mad old Preacher. We walked on and found a campsite on a cliff face overlooking the ocean.

Michele nervously told me the man with the circus pants had said I was rude not to stop and talk with him (ie give him money), and that tonight he would visit us and slice our tent up to teach us a lesson. I told her he would do no such thing and not to worry. But I made sure my tripod was close at hand in case he decided to pay us a moonlight visit.

I think that experience at Guvano Beach sums up the spirit of ‘In search of la dolce vita’ We just went out there and did it, we didn’t let anything stop us! Before every shot, I’d set up two cameras, mics and lights. No crowd control, in public spaces, crying babies, loud scooters, meals gone cold after numerous takes, you name it. I didn’t even have time to run a comb through my hair before most scenes, and you can tell!

And Michele, trying to converse in a language she doesn’t speak every day, learning the cold hard reality of the time and energy it takes to make things look like we are having the most relaxing dream vacation of all time, and then hopping into Caldo the car to drive to the next location, windows down air-conditioning, always racing the clock.

For her first experience in front of a camera, and working in the field on a production, it was a baptism of fire. It is amazing we looked so calm and unflustered, at least in the takes that made the final cut!

So I hope you enjoy our little film, a glorious romp through some of Italy’s most picturesque locations. Meeting the locals that make it their home and asking them what defines the good life. Here is a brief rundown of the storyline:

Two strangers travel through Italy searching for la dolce vita, asking local people about love, life and happiness, and finding answers themselves along the way.

Scott is an Australian wineblogger who had minor success with his first novel. He has lost interest in writing and is undergoing a midlife crisis. Charlotte is a Luxembourg fan of Scott who befriended him online and invited him to join her on a trip through Italy. She has been a librarian for 15 years and feels ready for a change, but is unsure what.

On a roadtrip taking in some of the most scenic parts of Italy – Aosta, Lake Como, Venice, Cinque Terre, Tuscany, Umbria and the Amalfi Coast, Scott and Charlotte meet the locals and learn the secrets of what makes a good life!

Food, wine, tradition, family, love and more wine!

To view the entire 40 minute film, please follow the link below ~


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About

about

Overlander.tv has been set up by Mark Shea who has been making films for over 20 years. He is a digital pioneer in the online video arena, many times working solo or with a small crew, to quickly and unobtrusively, complete productions for upload while in the field.

Our team explore the world with fresh eyes, seeking out contemporary stories that map out the defining spirit and ideas of our time.

Our films, such as The Way – One man’s spiritual journey along the Camino de Santiago, explore the use of lightweight equipment and personalised presentation to captivate our viewers and make them feel part of the journey.

We have worked all over the world producing our unique meet a local travel series and have produced a number of thought provoking documentaries for such broadcasters as Australia’s National Broadcaster, the ABC

#Filming on #lakecomo at #villamonastero #travel #Italy #Overlandertv

A post shared by overlander.tv (@overlandertv) on

COMPLETED PROGRAMS

Overlander.tv make honest to goodness travel related content that capture the thrill of travel! We understand that travellers want the truth about the places they wish to visit, so we endeavour to make authentic videos that rely heavily on the advice of locals. Our youtube channel is Australia’s Biggest Travel Channel with 20 million+ views and 35,000+ subscribers.

Journey to the West Series – Australian Motorcycle Adventure
2016 4 x half hour series or 87 min feature

“A world traveler returns to his own country to explore it’s West Coast on a motorcycle. An exercise in simplicity, camping out and getting off the beaten track. A chance to reassess life choices. The freedom to explore alternatives. What is it we need to be happy and is Australia still the lucky country”

In search of La Dolce Vita
2015
One Hour

Two strangers travel through italy searching for la dolce vita, asking local people about love, life and happiness, and finding answers themselves along the way.
Scott is an Australian wineblogger who had minor success with his first novel. He has lost interest in writing and is undergoing a midlife crisis. Charlotte is a Luxembourg fan of Scott who befriended him online and invited him to join her on a trip through Italy. She has been a librarian for 15 years and feels ready for a change, but is unsure what.
On a roadtrip taking in some of the most scenic parts of Italy – Aosta, Lake Como, Venice, Cinque Terre, Tuscany, Umbria and the Amalfi Coast, Scott and Charlotte meet the locals and learn the secrets of what make a good life!

American Roadtrip
2014
3 x 30 mins

Overlander.tv spent four months traveling the length and breadth of America, from Hollywood to the Wild West, from the Deep South to the Latin American vibes of Miami, from moonshine stills in the Tennessee Hills, to the frenetic pace of downtown New York, and finally visiting the post apocalyptic urban decay of Detroit and the rebirth of cool in the Rust Belt City of Cleveland.
Australian Filmmaker Mark Shea’s personable style features first person stories with locals at each destination he visited. It gives each story a candid insight into where America stands in what many call the Asian Century.

The Original Travel Vlogger – Central America
2012
4 x 30 mins
Guatemala, Mexico, Belize and Cuba

Youtube’s original travel vlogger explores the culture, food and people of Central America, including a sailing trip to Cuba.

The Original Travel Vlogger – Asia
2011
8 x 30 mins

Youtube’s original travel vlogger explores the culture, food and people of Asia, visiting Bali, Malaysia, Borneo, Philippines, Japan, South Korea, China, Laos, Cambodia and the hermit kingdom North Korea.

Meet the Locals – New Zealand
2010
One Hour

Explore New Zealand’s top tourist destinations by meeting the locals

African Refugees
2008
Four part series commissioned by the ABC

Mark Shea examines the African refugee experience in Tasmania. The African community started arriving in Tasmania in 1994 and since then 1,700 people have arrived, with 60%-70% settling in greater Hobart, and the remainder settling in and around Launceston.
Sudan, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Ethiopia are some of the communities now represented in Tasmania

Meet the Locals – Tasmania
2006
One Hour

Explore Tasmania’s top tourist destinations by meeting the locals

Meet the Locals – Vietnam
2006
30 minutes

Explore Vietnam’s top tourist destinations by meeting the locals

Meet the locals – Spain
2006
One Hour

Explore Spain’s top tourist destinations by meeting the locals

Meet the locals – Ireland
2006
One Hour

Explore Ireland’s top tourist destinations by meeting the locals

Last Outback Boxing Troupe
2006
Four part series commissioned by the ABC

Fred Brophy’s Boxing Troupe is the last tent operating in the world. Before the early 1970’s, Traveling Boxing Tents were part of the regular landscape at most country shows.
The tents have such a long tradition in Australia, that in some towns, a young man will fight in the tent, watched proudly by their grandfather and father, both of whom also fought in a tents as young men.
When Fred Brophy retires, is it the end of the road for the Tent Boxing tradition.

The Way, Camino de Santiago, Spain
2004
75 Mins

The Camino de Santiago in Northern Spain is one of the world’s most popular Pilgrimages.
Filmmaker Mark Shea wished to explore the spiritual affect the Camino (Way of St. James) has on pilgrims, by walking the French Way alone and documenting his own personal experiences.
The resulting film is an honest and joyous portrayal of the transformative nature of this
ancient practice.
A must see for anyone who has walked the Camino, or anyone who has plans of partaking in this life changing experience in the future.

Returning Home, A story of Ararat, ABC
2004
Four part series commissioned by the ABC (online flash format)

Follows the fortunes of the country town of my birth, Ararat

Meet the Locals – Australia Series
2001
4 x 30 minutes

Visit Australia’s top tourist destinations, from the outback to the coast, exploring each location, through the eyes of local guides.

In search of la dolce vita preview video

Two strangers travel through italy searching for la dolce vita, asking local people about love, life and happiness, and finding answers themselves along the way.

Scott is an Australian wineblogger who had minor success with his first novel. He has lost interest in writing and is undergoing a midlife crisis. Charlotte is a Luxembourg fan of Scott who befriended him online and invited him to join her on a trip through Italy. She has been a librarian for 15 years and feels ready for a change, but is unsure what.

On a roadtrip taking in some of the most scenic parts of Italy – Aosta, Lake Como, Venice, Cinque Terre, Tuscany, Umbria and the Amalfi Coast, Scott and Charlotte meet the locals and learn the secrets of what make a good life!

Food, wine, tradition, family, love and more wine!

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My life as a Travel Filmmaker

When I was a teenager the old nuns at the Catholic School I attended let us watch the Matinee of a Movie called ‘World Safari’. It featured a bare chested adventurer called Alby Mangels who galavanted around the world with a mongrel dog and a penchant for models in bikinis. For me, watching this movie set me on a path, I too wanted to see the world, film my adventures and have a girl in every port! Well, probably not as a 13 year old, but his escapades did look damn exciting, a lot more exciting than the small country town I felt stuck in!

So I bought my Dad’s old campervan and planned a trip round Australia with two mates. When we finished school, the two mate’s pulled out! I think their families hassled them to ‘get a real job’. I didn’t give up that easily and set off up the East Coast by myself. I stopped in at different places along the coast, doing odd jobs here and there, until I hit Cairns in the rainy season, got homesick and scuttled back home to spend the rest of the year regretting my decision, working as a roustabout!

It wasn’t until the mid 90’s that I rehashed my travel video dreams. Technology meant broadcast quality digital video cameras became affordable. So I bought a Sony VX700 and set off round Australia with my brother, both of us sleeping in the crowded confines of the back of a ute! I’d learnt to use the camera filming weddings and looking back, Paul was maybe a better interviewer than me. Or maybe it was more to the point that I wanted to interview all the pretty young girls, leaving him all the interesting older guys to interview!

I ended up getting a job in television, working as a sound guy. I realised the television industry compartmentalised people, if you were a soundie, you could never hope to be a producer. I didn’t like the idea of this. I’d previously done everything; find the story, do the interview, film the interview, record the sound and then edit the bloody thing! And books like ‘Rebel without a crew’ gave me hope that there was another way.

So to the displeasure of my mother, I quit my well paying sound production job and set off round Australia to make my own travel series. I wanted to do things differently, I disliked the host lead travel shows that didn’t really get under the skin of a location, or even meet a local. So I devised a concept called ‘Meet the Locals’. It must have been good because Lonely Planet copied the format a couple of years later! But what could I do, I was some young punk, outside the industry, doing everything myself. As I already knew, tv didn’t work that way!

Then came online video. I could see the opportunities, a world wide audience, no regulation, anyone could become their own tv station. So I set up a travel video website in 2000, five years before youtube. The bandwidth at the time wasn’t really conducive with playing video. The videos had to be compressed so much, one nearly needed a magnifying glass to see them! In fact the first project I did with the ABC was done in flash with some moving images to give the appearance of video!

I didn’t find a lot of support from television stations to buy my programs. They still couldn’t comprehend one person doing everything. So I sold DVD’s and just continued having fun making videos.

l watched the online video space very closely, youtube wasn’t always the front runner. I originally thought blip.tv would rule the roost. Who you ask….exactly! Youtube managed to establish themselves as number one and mainly because they helped nourish a new form of video content – video blogging.

I won’t lie, when I first saw people talking into their webcams in their bedrooms, I thought, what is this crap, this isn’t film-making! But it’s funny, because in the end, I had to start vlogging myself, out of necessity.

I got on the youtube bandwagon, uploaded some of my older programs into destination sized snippets and ended up being noticed and added as one of Australia’s first partners in 2006. It really wasn’t until 2011 that ads took off on youtube and I started making enough money to consider setting off on a travel video adventure.

I was lucky to have traveled all of Asia and most of Central America in 2011 and 2012. I was on a crest of a wave, money was coming in, I was traveling in cheap countries, I was completely cut of from the normal bounds of society. It was a recipe for disaster!

I realised on the road I really had to change my style. No longer did I have the time or resources to do grand productions of each location I visited. So I cut things right back, I simplified shit. I became….a Vlogger! There was so much amazing stuff I was seeing that I wanted to share it all, and I didn’t really pace myself. After the first location I visited, Bali, I ended up with so much footage, I just didn’t have the time to edit it all. I was exhausted, I needed a break, so I took refuge in a cheap hotel in Kuching, Borneo.

You’ve probably seen Apocalypse Now, the film based on Joseph Conrad’s book ‘Heart of Darkness’ The Westerner cut lose in the foreign country, left to face their own demons. I became that man, a libertine, with too much money and too much time, and no one to tell me to pull my head in. Beers for breakfast..why not! Party every night…let’s do it! On the backpacking trail you will always find someone willing to join you in the debauchery of being free of the normal rigours of Western Life!

Understandably my videos took an interesting turn. I’d like to call it my experimental phase. And there are only so many weird videos one can make before people start tuning out!

Believe it or not, despite my good fortune, I started to question what I was doing. I started to question social media and my role in it. Something inside me just didn’t really sit well with the cult of celebrity.

And I think subconsciously, I started to try and destroy everything. I know it probably sounds ridiculous, that here I was, one of the biggest travel channels on youtube, getting paid to travel the world and yet I wasn’t satisfied!

I missed not having a girlfriend, I missed having people around me who knew me and could tell me I was out of control. I was alone in the wilds of Borneo, engaging in ever more risky behaviours. Mixing with alcoholic expats, outlaw activists and indigenous shamens. And I was angry, ‘This is my dream God Damn it, why aren’t I enjoying it!’

I found ways to deal with it, the constant moving, the two day romances that ended in the next town. I think I hardened my heart. There is something about time in relationships, we need time to truly know another. And as much as it was fun to meet people along the way, I needed stronger bonds. I was still the outsider, just passing through.

I’m now back in Australia and another adversary has raised their grizzled hand, age! I’m now in my 40’s, a whole new generation is now bearing the torch, they appeal to the next generation (tweens) and I don’t! I’m more like the quirky uncle with some good stories, but much like Dad! Youtube is essentially an advertising algorithm, and when you realise this you can understand exactly how it works!

The wheel of life keeps turning, I must accept I am not Peter Pan. And in the process my interests have changed, the topics I choose to cover. I recently visited the USA and Canada, and I’d say my favourite story was in British Columbia, not featuring the stunning natural beauty but the squalid conditions of the street people of Downtown Eastside Vancouver.

I remember being in Squamish, a beautiful town. I’d spent the day down by a river, surrounded by nature, and I felt drawn back to the harsh streets of Downtown Eastside, I felt compelled to tell it’s story.

My next adventures will feature motorcycles and yachts, the toys of middle aged men, arise and fall, the circle continues. I find it funny now to see people on linkedin called ‘Social Media Experts’. Who really knows what the hell is happening online! I find it sad to see instagram accounts of young girls made up of nothing but scantily clad pictures, it’s like a needy call for attention. When l see these things, l make that noise that only older men make, that low gutteral grunt. All kids know that grunt, it’s the ‘stop bullshitting me’ grunt. The ‘l’ve seen it all before’ grunt!

So what did I learn from my travels, from my time cut free from the normal bounds of society. Well, I think a man or women can be a maverick, a prodigy, a genius, a pioneer, but without other people, we’re nothing! And no matter how much you fight it, that old humdinger ‘love’ always raises it’s flawed human heart!

So would l change it all if l had my time again? Well, l don’t know if l could! I couldn’t be a tourism puppet all the time, pushing some bullshit about ‘living the adventure!’

Because sometimes travel IS hard, you are made to face yourself, to learn what you can overcome. And this my friends is what can make travel so rewarding, stepping outside what you know, and embracing the unknown. Buen Camino!

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